Why do Judges call themselves your honor?

Under our constitution people that work for the state or government cannot give themselves self title's. Your HONOR is a self title.
Answer:   I think its an attempt to separate himself and his own personal opinions from the direction and verdicts he has to render each day. Most Judges are strictly bound by the Law to render a very definate decision to a case and his "opinion" doesn't really count for much... besides, he's got one of those jobs where he's wrong every time at least 50% of the time. It's an attempt to retain their own personality in a job that robs them of it. I just wish they'd quit taking money for verdicts!
I assume it has something to do with the idea of being an authority over judgement. I refer to myself as honorable all the time. Now I will take my honorable *** downstairs and get a sandwich.
I believe it's more tradition than law. Officially, they're just "Judge So-and-so."
You're right, judges don't give themselves any title, they are representatives of the legal system and are given the honorable duty of deciding law in legal proceedings. We call them 'your honor' because of the duty they perform and what it takes in order to reach such a position not because it is a noble title. It is a title that is earned through hardwork and a lifetime of practicing law.
ego maniacs, corrupt just like the rest of the judicial branch.
"Your honor" is an honorific title traditionally used by judges. It is to acknowledge the dignity of the position of judge.

An "honorific" is a word or expression that conveys esteem or respect and is used in addressing the person. Many people use the honorific as a substitute for the person's name. Other less formal honorifics are the words "sir" or "madam." Words such as "Doctor", "Reverend", "Rabbi," etc. are also honorific titles.

In addition to using "Your Honor" for judges, it is also used for mayors, governors, and certain cabinet secretaries in government.


The Answers post by the user, for information only, FreeLawAnswer does not guarantee the right.
Answer question:


More Questions and Answers: