Is it legal to write on a dollar bill?

I'm not going to destroy it, just write a website address in the margin. I am thinking that it might be a free source of advertisement, seeing as how bills travel throughout the community and country.

Answers:
The short answer: for advertising, it is illegal, but to simply write on it (with say, some political or idealogical slogan or just to print your name), it is not.

You may be familiar with the wheresgeorge currency tracking project. If not, here's a link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/where%27s_g...

Essentially, MILLIONS of banknotes of multiple denominations were stamped with "www.wheresgeorge."

An excerpt from the link:

"In April 2000, it was investigated by the United States Secret Service, which informed the webmaster that the selling of "Where's George?" rubber stamps on the web site is considered "advertising" on United States currency, which is illegal under 18 U.S.C. ยง 475.[2] The web site immediately ceased selling rubber stamps and no further action against the site was taken. However, the general view is that using Where's George? rubber stamps on currency is not illegal per se and a variety are available from stamp vendors not affiliated with the Where's George? web site."

The life-cycle of a 1 dollar bill is about 18 months so I would estimate that if you wrote on a brand new dollar bill, it would exchange hands about 100-200 times. The question is, how many people in the busy act of exchanging money would actually take time out to glance at the dollar bill and then, on top of that, how many people would notice the web address AND link to your site. Perhaps 2-5 for each bill over 18 months? Maybe that's worth it for you.
technically it is but no one can catch you so just do it anyway..
o.k. I wouldnt do it. its defacing goverment property. Not a good idea for advertising.
go for it, technically you paid for that currency to be made so its not free advertisement, just no mustaches on our forefathers
they won't enforce it, you dunno why anyone would put your website on it... you should draw anarchy's and upside down flags n **** too... oh and "**** the troops" that would be nice... piss off some worthless patriotic douche bag.
YES IF ITS THE NAME OF A HOT CHICK
Technically it is illegal to write on a dollar bill they call it "Defacing Government Property." No one can track you if you do, but that is the reason "WheresGeorge.com" Had to stop selling their stamps it was encouraging the defacement of government property.
TITLE 18--CRIMES AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE

PART I--CRIMES

CHAPTER 17--COINS AND CURRENCY

Sec. 333. Mutilation of national bank obligations

Whoever mutilates, cuts, defaces, disfigures, or perforates, or
unites or cements together, or does any other thing to any bank bill,
draft, note, or other evidence of debt issued by any national banking
association, or Federal Reserve bank, or the Federal Reserve System,
with intent to render such bank bill, draft, note, or other evidence of
debt unfit to be reissued, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned
not more than six months, or both.

(June 25, 1948, ch. 645, 62 Stat. 700; Pub. L. 103-322, title XXXIII,
Sec. 330016(1)(B), Sept. 13, 1994, 108 Stat. 2146.)


Historical and Revision Notes

Based on title 18, U.S.C., 1940 ed., Sec. 291 (Mar. 4, 1909, ch.
321, Sec. 176, 35 Stat. 1122).
Words ``or Federal Reserve bank, or the Federal Reserve System''
were inserted because the paper of such banks has almost supplanted
national bank currency.
Reference to persons causing or procuring was omitted as unnecessary
in view of definition of ``principal'' in section 2 of this title.
Minor changes in phraseology were made.


Amendments

1994--Pub. L. 103-322 substituted ``fined under this title'' for
``fined not more than $100''.

TITLE 18--CRIMES AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE

PART I--CRIMES

CHAPTER 17--COINS AND CURRENCY

Sec. 331. Mutilation, diminution, and falsification of coins

Whoever fraudulently alters, defaces, mutilates, impairs,
diminishes, falsifies, scales, or lightens any of the coins coined at
the mints of the United States, or any foreign coins which are by law
made current or are in actual use or circulation as money within the
United States; or
Whoever fraudulently possesses, passes, utters, publishes, or sells,
or attempts to pass, utter, publish, or sell, or brings into the United
States, any such coin, knowing the same to be altered, defaced,
mutilated, impaired, diminished, falsified, scaled, or lightened--
Shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than five
years, or both.

(June 25, 1948, ch. 645, 62 Stat. 700; July 16, 1951, ch. 226, Sec. 1,
65 Stat. 121; Pub. L. 103-322, title XXXIII, Sec. 330016(1)(I), Sept.
13, 1994, 108 Stat. 2147.)


Historical and Revision Notes

Based on title 18, U.S.C., 1940 ed., Sec. 279 (Mar. 4, 1909, ch.
321, Sec. 165, 35 Stat. 1119).
Mandatory punishment provision was rephrased in the alternative.
Reference to persons causing or procuring was omitted as unnecessary
in view of definition of ``principal'' in section 2 of this title.
Changes were also made in phraseology.


Amendments

1994--Pub. L. 103-322 substituted ``fined under this title'' for
``fined not more than $2,000''.
1951--Act July 16, 1951, made section applicable to minor coins (5-
cent and 1-cent pieces), and to fraudulent alteration of coins.


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