What happens if you don't show up to court for an eviction count?


Answer:   1. Legally - you only have 5 - 15 days - depending what state you are in.

2. An automatic "Judgment" will be levied against you - which WILL show on your Credit Report.

3. Depending the State that you are in, You Could be Arrested!!! For Trespassing!!!!! I've seen this before with a former friend!

4. If you are in one these 'States' you will also have a Police Record for the rest of your life!!!!!! Once you have any conviction on your Record - you have Very little chance to get a Presidential Pardon - which is the Only way I know where your Criminal Record can be Wiped CLEAN!

5. Depending what state you are in and what city - you might not be able to get another rental without paying A VERY BIG DEPOSIT!!!!!

None of this is good!!!! Get OUT NOW!!!! To the Best of Your Ability!!!!

I wish you the Best in your endeavor. I've worked in Nursing and in Law!!!!

I've seen ALL of these things happen to people!!! In one case I saw the Defendant's children being given the Child Protective Services and because they could not get another big enough home - they DID loose their children for 5 years!!!!!!

This made me SICK - but, legally there was nothing I could do - At the time I was working for the state in the District Attorney's Office!!!!!

Take Care - Be Careful and God Bless!!!!
You will be evicted within 7 days.
They forcibly remove you in one week!
Eviction.
Any time you don't show up in court about anything you lose the case by default.
A default judgment is entered against you which means that the judge grants the person who filed this action against you will get everything that they asked for plus you would most likely also be ordered to pay for court costs. The courts go on with or without us. It is never, ever a good idea to think that if we don't go to court, it will somehow stop the proceedings. Start packing or you will find your stuff on the sidewalk.


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